twig-project:

Twig started as an experiment, but as soon as we started to include it into Symfony2, it became clear that it was a much better templating system than PHP.

Twig now enjoys a large community of developers and it has been adopted by many other Open-Source projects. Like what we did for Silex some…

sirink:

Hi guys,

Here im gonna give you some working sample codes for performing basic operations(CRUD) in sails.js(node.js).

Step1:Create a new sails.js app

<code>
$ sails new myapp1

$cd myapp1

$npm install sails-mongo

or if you are using postgreSQl run the below command

$npm install...

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This surrealistic timelapse doesn’t show an ocean in the sky. These are undulatus asperatus clouds rolling over Lincoln, Nebraska. Also known simply as asperatus, this cloud formation has been proposed as but not yet recognized as a distinctive cloud type. Their speed is much slower than shown in the animation, but the wave-like motion is accurate and is the source of the cloud’s name, which comes from the Latin word aspero, meaning to make rough. Though they appear stormy, asperatus clouds do not usually produce storms. They form under conditions similar to those of mammatus clouds, but wind shear at the cloud level causes the undulations to form. (Maybe some Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities going on there?) You can check out many more images of asperatus clouds at the Cloud Appreciation Society’s gallery. (Image credit: A. Schueth, source video; submitted by leftcoastjunkies)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This surrealistic timelapse doesn’t show an ocean in the sky. These are undulatus asperatus clouds rolling over Lincoln, Nebraska. Also known simply as asperatus, this cloud formation has been proposed as but not yet recognized as a distinctive cloud type. Their speed is much slower than shown in the animation, but the wave-like motion is accurate and is the source of the cloud’s name, which comes from the Latin word aspero, meaning to make rough. Though they appear stormy, asperatus clouds do not usually produce storms. They form under conditions similar to those of mammatus clouds, but wind shear at the cloud level causes the undulations to form. (Maybe some Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities going on there?) You can check out many more images of asperatus clouds at the Cloud Appreciation Society’s gallery. (Image credit: A. Schueth, source video; submitted by leftcoastjunkies)

prostheticknowledge:

Ghost In The Machine

Portrait artwork by Ted Lawson is drawn with a machine using a direct feed of blood from the artist as the ink - video embedded below:

Artist, Ted Lawson, creates a life-sized self-portrait drawing, in his own blood, using a robot.

Link

scienceisbeauty:

Some key facts about radiation:
It’s a natural process.
Our bodies are constantly exposed to radiation.
Our bodies are designed to be exposed to it every single day without any harm to our health.
It isn’t killing us.
It isn’t man-made.
Only an infinitesimal amount of it comes from nuclear power plants and uranium mines.
Please, read the full article if you still afraid to radioactivity: Radiation Reality Check (by Andrea Jennetta).

scienceisbeauty:

Some key facts about radiation:

  • It’s a natural process.
  • Our bodies are constantly exposed to radiation.
  • Our bodies are designed to be exposed to it every single day without any harm to our health.
  • It isn’t killing us.
  • It isn’t man-made.
  • Only an infinitesimal amount of it comes from nuclear power plants and uranium mines.

Please, read the full article if you still afraid to radioactivity: Radiation Reality Check (by Andrea Jennetta).

(via insidious-effects-of-life-deact)

couch:


This is me, my parents, and computer science.

couch:

This is me, my parents, and computer science.

(Source: buttpoems)

hbbio:

There was some discussion yesterday on Hacker News when I wrote in a comment that we are considering releasing a new open source project.

Screenshot of PEPS hn account

PEPS is secure webmail server with a rich UI, with the goal of being an open source GMail alternative. No doubt there is a huge interest in having…

bryanbowman:

street wars

bryanbowman:

street wars

riolity:

We’ve been enjoying the company of Quentin in from that windy (and still snowy) city!! The creator of this little #treasure I call Snake Eye is doin me up a riq I am so stoked for!! The prototype has been hammered out (Q-pun, lollers!), and you can gitchoo one too soon!! Loooove his beautiful work and its organic nature, deep full sounds to bell tones. Give him a shout, instruments or #sculpture: drumfacechicago.com #Qdrum #drumface #drums #doumbek #darbuka #metalart #ooak

riolity:

We’ve been enjoying the company of Quentin in from that windy (and still snowy) city!! The creator of this little #treasure I call Snake Eye is doin me up a riq I am so stoked for!! The prototype has been hammered out (Q-pun, lollers!), and you can gitchoo one too soon!! Loooove his beautiful work and its organic nature, deep full sounds to bell tones. Give him a shout, instruments or #sculpture: drumfacechicago.com #Qdrum #drumface #drums #doumbek #darbuka #metalart #ooak

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Joint popping is one of those things some people revel in and others detest. What you may not have realized, though, is that fluid dynamics are responsible for the sound. Joints contain a non-Newtonian liquid called synovial fluid to lubricate them. When you manipulate the joint to stretch it, pressure in the fluid drops and gases dissolved in the synovial fluid are released, forming a cavitation bubble. The creation and collapse of this bubble are what cause the audible popping. (Video credit: SciShow)

architectureus:

Hotel Porta Fira, Barcelona Catalonia Surrealist architecture

architectureus:

Hotel Porta Fira, Barcelona Catalonia Surrealist architecture

F.J.K.M. Ambolo Vavolombelona seen from the ground (as of the date of the post).

F.J.K.M. Ambolo Vavolombelona seen from the ground (as of the date of the post).

1oyenmanzyu:

d-d-d:

gkojaz:

5beat:

darylfranz:

benewmeister:

nemoi:

thinkupstudio:

kml:

aoyamana:

Aluminum cello
why-i-design:

kazu721010:

The new Metz Cathedral / Shigeru Ban

This is amazing…

why-i-design:

kazu721010:

The new Metz Cathedral / Shigeru Ban

This is amazing…